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H Έλενα Παναρίτη καλεσμένη στη Δημόσια Ραδιοφωνία “Η αρχή του τέλους για το Ευρώ”

5 Jun

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE_dr6AZB_I&feature=youtu.be

Η Έλενα Παναρίτη σχολιάζει τα αποτελέσματα των Ευρωεκλογών και την τρέχουσα ελληνική πολιτική κατάσταση

5 Jun

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joOWrX6SKYg&feature=youtu.be

Elena Panaritis : “Bruised and confused: why Greeks voted against the gods of Europe” (The Guardian)

2 Jun

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http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jun/01/greeks-electorate-voted-against-europe-eu-austerity

Elena Panaritis

Bruised and confused: why Greeks voted against the gods of Europe

Ravaged by austerity measures and caricatured as lousy managers and born tax evaders, the Greek electorate went left and right in their efforts to say no to the EU

In last month’s elections a majority of Greeks – now routinely depicted by the gods of Europe as lousy managers and born tax-evaders – reacted by shunning the pro-EU parties. They made the anti-European and populist left and far-right parties the rising stars at the polls. Even Syriza, the radical (though not so radical any more) leftwing party that secured 26.6% of the votes did not do as well as expected. Once very anti-austerity and ready to go up against Brussels, it has since watered down its tactics.

Analysing the results via ideological labels is perhaps less important than seeing beyond the political shake-up to the bruised reputation of a very proud people. The Greeks now often feel like unwanted guests at the EU table.

Add to this feeling the economic realities: the imposed never-ending austerity, GDP reduced by 30% and nearly wiping out the middle class, and the grim future Greek people face with youth unemployment running at over 60% (28% overall).

From the start of Greece‘s economic crisis, most of the richer EU members were emotional and openly angry, blaming the Greeks for all their woes when in fact it wasn’t a problem of household private deficit and overspending, but of public sector mismanagement and bad governance.

The crisis was the end result of an overly bureaucratic and cumbersome system that became even more bureaucratic because of additional European directives. A lack of transparency facilitated the mishandling of government and public budgeting.

What was so much needed was reform and simplification, allowing for transparency to build trust. This is the missing ingredient with the national government, and now EU governance.

Ironically the Greeks, in contrast with many other Europeans, have long been pro-integration since the Treaty of Rome in the 1960s. They adopted the euro – putting to rest the drachma, the oldest currency in the western world – with optimism. Compare this reaction with, say, France, where prices are still printed in both euros and old French francs. And when the troika of the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the IMF arrived in Athens to help the country put its financial house in order, they were widely welcomed. Most Greeks believed the troika could fix a broken system.

Instead, Greece’s “bail-out” packages, initially at high interest rates, were perceived clearly to be only money transfers for the Greek state to pay back its debt. Persistent austerity and fiscal measures eroded further some of the healthy forms of governance that remained (police and judiciary included). This allowed for the rise of the far-right ultra-nationalist Golden Dawn, especially in urban centres.

Not surprisingly, then, the troika’s welcome was short-lived. Those who are suffering the consequences of bad governance and politics are the middle class, the low-income earners, the pensioners receiving just ¤600 a month and now unable to cover their basic needs. They feel insecure and unprotected. Meanwhile, those who took advantage of the old ways of bad governance seem not to be touched that much. In short, the euphoric pro-European mood soured and turned into a silent vote of dissatisfaction and a clear: “Thank you, EU, but no thank you.” What did for the EU in the elections is the serious lack of leadership it has shown in tough times. The euro crisis, for instance, was persistently not seen as such, but blamed as a Greek crisis for its first three years.

More specifically, the stubborn unwillingness of Brussels to use its powers to make quick decisions and avoid the spreading of the crisis constituted a supreme error.

Instead, decisions were offloaded on to the national parliaments. The same parliaments were never asked to approve European subsidies on common agricultural policy or regional harmonisation policy.

The reality was a non-handling of the crisis. We observed the lack of any leadership and responsibility. This created two very different forms of punishment. The first, from the markets, spread the euro crisis and credit “downgrading” of several countries, including France (the second pillar of the Union with Germany). The second punishment, carried by grassroots anger, came from the people, demanding a change of the EU, as seen in last month’s elections

So, in the case of Greece, this is a response to the blind following of austerity which prolonged recession and created a great depression – as well as producing greater inequalities and making a recovery difficult to see.

In the north (France, Germany, Austria), the Eurosceptics are gaining for different reasons. The people are tired of being asked to give more to the south and to those “lazy and irresponsible Greeks” especially since they have their own domestic issues to address.

Leaders are asked to take brave decisions – these still haven’t been taken in Europe, and quite frankly I do not think they will be taken soon because Europe has become a big bureaucratic elephant with a life of its own. Large entities like this are not known for their ability to be flexible or adapt to the reality on the ground. I fear things will become worse before they start getting better.

A growing number of Greeks and other Europeans are now tired. They do not see any light at the end of the tunnel. Positive political statements about the end of the crisis mean very little to them. In general, the EU has disappointed the Greeks. Instead of making decisions, the EU postponed them. There was a lot of talk, endless meetings in Brussels; kicking the can down the road every time only prolonged the pain. This created anger, discontent and impatience.

Europe is no longer the club of the elite (De Gaulle and Adenauer, Mitterrand and Kohl) and these elections made it clear. Last month’s vote reflects this change. The bottom line is that the euro crisis game was played out in Greece, and the European vision has been lost in Brussels.

Elena Panaritis is an economist who has worked at the World Bank and was a Pasok member of the Greek parliament from 2009 until 2012

CNBC: H Έλενα Παναρίτη σχολιάζει τα αποτελέσματα των Ευρωεκλογών

26 May

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http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000278774

CNBC: Elena Panaritis comments on EU elections results – Is greek coalition still strong?

26 May

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Elena Panaritis comments on EU elections results

Εlena Panaritis is interviewed about Tsipras and his views on European elections

20 May

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Εlena Panaritis is interviewed about Tsipras and his views on European elections

Women Entrepreneurship November 21 Thessaloniki

14 Nov

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PRESS RELEASE

Women Entrepreneurship

Thursday 21 November 2013 19:00

New Town Hall, Thessaloniki

 

Elena Panaritis @

Economist, Impact Investor, Social Entrepreneur, Policy Innovator

Founder & CEO of www.thoughtforaction.org

participates in open dialogue about women entrepreneurship

 

As part of Global Entrepreneurship Week 2013, Elena Panaritis, impact investor, specialized in policy innovation, is invited to share her knowledge and experience about women entrepreneurship in an open dialogue which is organized by the British Council in collaboration with the Municipality of Thessaloniki and Europe Direct. The British Graduates Society has been invited to present their new nationwide research on women entrepreneurship in Greece.

The presentation will be followed by a public discussion with the participation of:

·                                 Elena Panaritis, Policy Innovator, Economist and Social Entrepreneur

·                                 Marina Ofloudis Giavroglou, Soya Mills Group

·                                 Nonita Papadopoulou Nonita, P.A.P. Corp.

·                                 Katerina Sarri, School of Business Adminstration, University of Macedonia

The event will be facilitated by journalist Paschos Mandravelis.

Elena Panaritis as an institutional economist and impact investor, specialised in social entrepreneurship and innovation policies is invited to talk about the prospects of women entrepreneurship in Greece.

Until recently she served as a special economics advisor to the Greek Prime Minister

and as a Member of Parliament of Greece. In more than a decade as an economist at

the World Bank, Elena spearheaded institutional/structural changes including property

rights reform in Peru that received International Best Practice and Innovation

awards (over 10Million are the beneficiaries). Elena’s reform methods have

revolutionized and forever changed the way people and policymakers think about

structural changes; and specifically about property rights and informality. As an

institutional economist she pioneered social entrepreneurship, she is renowned for her

success in transforming informal markets (by changing property rights) into vibrant,

growing formal economic and social entities. Her book Prosperity Unbound:

Building Property Markets with Trust (Palgrave Macmillan) recounts her experience

and expands on her methodology- “Reality Check Analysis”, which is considered

one of the best practical applications of institutional economics to property rights

issues. Robert Litan, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute and Vice President for

Research and Policy at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation of Entrepreneurship

calls her work “a real contribution.”

She is the founder of Panel Group, a triple-bottom-line business that focuses in

distressed cities and markets with high level of informality. Panel Group also provides

counsel to governments and private sector on how to apply structural reforms and

changes to transform illiquid assets (property) and turn markets more efficient and

productive. She has also founded Thought for Action, an educational foundation to

create awareness about transforming informality and countries under solvency crisis

like Greece. Elena Panaritis has taught economic development, housing finance and

property markets reform courses at the Wharton Business School, University of

Pennsylvania, INSEAD, and the Johns Hopkins University- School of Advanced

International Studies (SAIS). She blogs at: www.prosperityunbound.com

 

 

Συνέντευξη στο Bloomberg TV Δευτέρα 13 Αυγούστου 10:40 π.μ. ώρα Ελλάδος

13 Aug

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Η Έλενα Παναρίτη θα δώσει συνέντευξη ζωντανή αναμετάδωση στο Bloomberg TV σήμερα Δευτέρα 13 Αυγούστου στις 10:40 π.μ. ώρα Ελλάδος, για την Ελληνική Οικονομία.

Παρακολουθήστε ζωντανά στο: http://www.bloomberg.com/tv/europe/

Summary of roundtable discussion “Can Greece turn around? If yes How? When?”, Aug 3, 2012, House of Hellenes, London

6 Aug

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“Citigroup sees 90% chance that Greece Leaves Euro”, Bloomberg 25.07.12 “Greece cannot be saved, that is pure mathematics”, CDU’s Michael Fuchs, MP, 29.07.12 

Can Greece turn around? If yes How? When? 

The House of Hellenes played host to an open forum hosted by the British Hellenic Chamber of Commerce on whether “Can Greece turn around? If yes, how and when?” The focus of the discussion was based around the type of changes required to exit from a crisis which, as all speakers and participants agreed, has institutional, social and political causes, the financial crisis being just a result thereof. Focus also shifted on whether Greece will remain or exit the Eurozone, how future investment projects can be attracted and how to instil confidence in the market for altering the situation in the country.

The panel consisted of Vicky Pryce, City economist, former Director General, Economics, and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service, Thanos Vamvakidis, head of European G10 FX Strategy at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Elena Panaritis, economist specialising in structural reforms, former Greek MP and World Bank officer and currently CEO-founder of the Panel Group, Andreas Koutras, Director, ITC Markets.

Harris Ikonomopoulos, President of the British Hellenic Chamber of Commerce made an opening address and moderated the discussion.

All panellists had 10 minutes available to plead their case of whether Greece can turn around its economy, how and when. The audience consisted of international and Greek media, investors, financiers, bankers, economists, etc. After the keynote speakers presentations the floor was open to questions where some very important issues were raised and answered.

In summing up, the panellists offered their views on the situation as follows:

Harris Ikonomopoulos, referred to the elementary required structural reform for any other reform to be effective, a swift and effective correction of the Greek Constitution which could be achieved by a referendum with three yes/no questions, a referendum that would also provide the parliament with the power to proceed to any other requisite correction within a three to six month period. As Mr. Ikonomopoulos said: “unless and until society reinstates its confidence to Justice and the moral legitimacy of any government to govern is back in place – by abolishing the special statutes of limitations for the criminal liability of members of the government – unless the Constitution provides for an accountable system of Effective Governance – by specifying a fixed four or five year term for any elected government and tearing down political and personal conflicts between Cabinet members www.houseofhellenes.com www.facebook.com/HouseOfHellenes www.twitter.com/HouseofHellenes www.houseofhellenes.blogspot.com House of Hellenes, Carlton Club, 69 St James’s Street, London, UK

and MP’s – unless the Constitution provides Perspective – by an internationally competitive flat tax system that will reward success with a minimum fixed ten or fifteen year term for anyone who wants to choose Greece as a tax base – no matter how wise any policy may be it will not be able to be implemented, and no foreign direct investment will take place due to the lack of confidence and the “the country” risk that keeps any reasonable investor away. Greece is a small country, by correcting the basics Greece can turnaround fast. Europe, though, has to do the same”.

Thanos Vamvakidis said that “given the depth and the breadth of the crisis the coalition government in Greece has one only chance to demonstrate its commitment to reforms”. 

Elena Panaritis said that “the Greek crisis is more than an economic crisis, its a crisis of structures and systems of governance. Those claiming that structural reforms take time thus reforms should not focus there; in reality they hide behind vested interests. This is a serious trap we must not fall into! Greece must create a force of structural reforms (I.e. Reduce administrative burdens, costs and promote entrepreneurship) NOW. There is no more time left.”

Vicky Pryce substantiated why the problem is not Greece. Adding that “the crisis is a euro crisis that affects all Europe. It needs to be addressed as such.

Another conclusion from the discussion was that the debate regarding a possible Greek exit from the euro while it does not profit any government or investor, it is equally unacceptable as any discussion regarding a genocide would be. Greece produces only 20% of what Greeks consume, and any change of currency that would lead to devaluation of the country’s legal tender would result to a sharp rise of prices of medicine, foodstuff, heating oil, gas and other products that are necessary for the survival of the least able and the elders.

The audience questions and short addresses identified the lack of political leadership in Greece as a major deterrent for Greece’s turnaround, agreeing though that it is in times like this that new leaderships emerge .

The forum discussion was the closing event of The House of Hellenes in London 2012. The House of Hellenes, although closed, remains at the disposition of the Hellenic Olympic Committee and the National Olympic Team for Press conferences to celebrate any upcoming Olympic victories in London 2012. The Greek colours will keep flying on the House of Hellenes until the end of the London Games.

____ 

For more information on the “House of Hellenes” visit: 

www.houseofhellenes.com

www.facebook.com/HouseOfHellenes www.twitter.com/HouseofHellenes 

www.houseofhellenes.blogspot.com

or contact DK Associates, the “House of Hellenes” official media office: 

Katilena Alpe – katilena@dk-associates.co.uk or 07419564436 

Dimitra Kolotoura – dimitra@dk-associates.co.uk or 07984785054

Press Release of roundtable “Can Greece turn around? If yes How? When? “

6 Aug

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http://houseofhellenes.blogspot.gr/2012/08/press-release.html

“Citigroup sees 90% chance that Greece Leaves Euro”, Bloomberg 25.07.12 “Greece cannot be saved, that is pure mathematics”, CDU’s Michael Fuchs, MP, 29.07.12 

Can Greece turn around? If yes How? When? 

Friday 3rd August 2012, at 10am House of Hellenes, 69 St. James’s Street 

The British Hellenic Chamber of Commerce, is hosting “The House of Hellenes London 2012” closing event, a round table discussion on the future of Greece.

Can Greece effectively address in a timely manner its economy’s downward spiral? Are the EU and Greece equipped to face current and anticipated challenges on the social, political and economic front? If yes, how and when could Greece turn around?

Panelists Vicky Pryce, City economist and former joint head of the UK Governement Economic Service, Thanos Vamvakidis, head of European G10 FX Strategy at Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Elena Panaritis, economist specialising in structural reforms, former MP and CEO-founder of the Panel Group will present and argue a 10’ position each. Commentaries will be offered by Andreas Koutras, Director, ITC Markets and Ljubomir Dragicevic, National – Alamo Greece, Country Manager. Harris Ikonomopoulos, President of the British Hellenic Chamber of Commerce will introduce the discussion and shall act as moderator for panellists, commentators, business and media representatives.

Topics to be discussed include:

• The type of changes required

• The timeframe of changes

• Euro, Eurozone and the EU

• Future Investment Projects

• Financing of Projects

 

The invitation is open to anyone who wants to share insight, raise questions and get answers.

The round table discussion will take place on Friday 3rd August at 10am at the House of Hellenes, Carlton Club, 69 St. James’s Street, SW1A 1PJ.

Please, register with the House of Hellenes in order to attend: www.houseofhellenes.com  www.facebook.com/HouseOfHellenes www.twitter.com/HouseofHellenes www.houseofhellenes.blogspot.com House of Hellenes, Carlton Club, 69 St James’s Street, London, UK

For more information on the “House of Hellenes” visit: 

www.houseofhellenes.com

www.facebook.com/HouseOfHellenes

www.twitter.com/HouseofHellenes

www.houseofhellenes.blogspot.com 

or contact DK Associates, the “House of Hellenes” official media office: 

Katilena Alpe – katilena@dk-associates.co.uk or 07419564436 

Dimitra Kolotoura – dimitra@dk-associates.co.uk or 07984785054